Mack & the Art of the Photobook : Parr et al and its Future.

MA in Photography, Falmouth University, Module 4, Sustainable Prospects.  Research.

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figure 1

Michael Mack, interviewed by Alexander Strecker in a recent post in Lensculture, sets out a really personal account of how he ‘ticks’ and what makes the quality of his production such a desirable and tangible thing.  Strecker sums him up thus  “there are three core beliefs that underpin everything Mack has done: first, mentors are essential; second, human relationships are paramount; and finally, that personal enjoyment is the key to long-term success”.

I make no apology in extracting substantial tracts of the interview as they serve a strong purpose, especially as it sets the agenda for my ambition to make a photobook at a future point.

On his motivations Mack says “I’m driven by a very simplistic, life-affirming notion: I want to keep enjoying what I’m doing. I don’t want to only be running a business, because much of that is quite tedious. You could be selling widgets, if all you’re focusing on is the Excel spreadsheets. In the end, the reason we are doing well is because of our attention to detail and the specificity of each design. I don’t want to do more books. I’d prefer to produce fewer titles that are higher in quality.

On the place for the tangible as opposed to the digital “there was a supposed revolution about to happen in relation to the book and ink and paper. This simply did not occur. In fact, just the opposite: the ever-expanding digital realm created the capacity for small, light-footed entities, both publishing houses and individual artists, to create their own content and market it through digital platforms. That continues to define the moment we’re in right now. It has resulted in many, many people returning to analog, physical forms for various art objects”.

A glimpse about his collaborative approach for which he is renown “Whether someone is working on the street or in their studio, we have to be sure that a book is the best possible presentation for their work. It’s never simply a catalog, a gallery takeaway, we have a studio space where the artists come and work. We bring in our designers and we sit, edit, and talk. We’ll do three days of intense work together, and then they’ll go away for a month. Then we come back together, allowing things to distill further. We give things time”.

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Figure 2

A Magnum website discussion between Olivia Arthur, Martin Parr and Fred Ritchen they review the 20 year march of the photobook; here Arthur opines “People still have a huge desire for the book, for the printed object that they can hold.” which is good to read as the future looks positive for the medium. Parr lays down the challenge for both image making and the need for purpose in a publication Photography is the easiest thing in the world but also the most difficult. It’s very easy to take a body of work and in an afternoon turn it into a book that looks contemporary and exciting but it has no soul, no message, no real substance. People believe they have made an important contribution to photography but they haven’t” 

The audience ‘span’ is addressed by Ritchin “Photobooks are having a golden era but the concern is that we are making them for each other,” and he goes on “It’s not sufficient to just talk to each other at this point. I’m looking for something that restates where we are in different ways.” and Arthur expresses her aspiration “I think we see this big cloud which is the photobook audience and what’s interesting is trying to go out and think about things differently and saying I’m going to reach these people because this is what I want to do,” and she volunteers this “We aspire to be like each other, too much so.”

Practice Planning

I aspire to create a photobook on the Pause Project.  I therefore peruse photobooks and seek out, not only the product, but the process to establish the timescale, costs, qualities and, overall, the purpose and visual/textual messaging that would create value in the widest sense of that term.  Both of these articles provide a good context to the qualitative positioning of a book.

I have started discussions with the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce about presenting the Pause Project, with a view to widening shooting opportunities but also the potential for sponsorship of a book project.  To maximise this I will be researching the sponsorship model, knowing full well that it will be often seen by sponsors as a return on investment and as such may be viewed as a form of crowd-funding modelling that will require the offer of a tangible benefit/asset upon completion.  Watch this space in 2018.

References

All quotes on Mack and image, figure 1,  taken from (accessed 11.12.2017);

https://www.lensculture.com/articles/mack-books-the-enduring-power-of-the-printed-page-thoughts-from-michael-mack

All quotes on Mack and image, figure 2,  taken from (accessed 11.12.2017);

https://www.magnumphotos.com/theory-and-practice/future-of-the-photobook/

 

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One Shoot : Many Carpets

MA in Photography, Falmouth University, Module 4, Sustainable Prospects.  Shoots

During my slightly unsatisfying shoot at 123 Hagley Road, Birmingham (John Madin’s own office/studio, now vacated and due, in the long term for demolition) where I was uninspired by the shoot in general (for example only one image has found its way into my work in progress portfolio) I noticed, especially during the download and review phase, that I had collected a group of images of floors in the radio station and other spaces.  Marks of use, trailing cables, spillages, tape, light, textures wear and some tears.  These create a small but interesting sub-set to the Pause Project.

 

Three Good Leads

MA in Photography, Falmouth University, Module 4, Sustainable Prospects.  Research.

A while ago I popped ‘artists that work in concrete’ into my search engine and began to uncover a series of intriguing but not wholly useful pages.

The serendipity of conversations that include the phrase “I am now working in concrete” has solicited responses from Jesse Alexander, Paul Clements and Argentea Gallery.  The age old technique of talking has reaped some super leads to three artists for three reasons;

Rebecca Fairley 

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figures 1, 2, 3

Fairley teaches and experiments at the Open College of the Arts with fabric and its interface and infusion with concrete in its wet form which cures into beautiful and intriguing results.  See figures 1, 2, 3.  She writes  “What I love about concrete is its form-finding behaviour. The mould materials and the concrete work together to create something exciting. I am never quite sure what the results will be and I find this exhilarating. I learnt that this hardwearing material is actually very sensitive, it picks up the smallest details of a fabrics surface, giving me the opportunity to create fine concrete textures” and approaches it from a gendered view “It struck me then that the concrete was no longer a masculine cold unforgiving material; in my hands it had become tactile, intriguing and feminine. This has led me to believe that there is a language of materials and a dialogue that occurs in the hands of the maker”.

She also cites a group that cast repetitive elements of work at the Tactility Factory  in Belfast –  their output looks quite exquisite; figure 4.

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figure 4

Both these processes and organisations I will be exploring and possibly meeting as my concrete work evolves.  I photographed a linen drawing in the summer and the possibility of reproducing that and moulding it with a concrete substrate has taken a step closer.

Samin Ahmadzadeh

screen-shot-2017-12-10-at-14-56-06.pngScreen Shot 2017-12-10 at 14.56.24Figures 5, 6

I was fortunate to see a solo exhibition by Ahmadzadeh in the Summer 2017 at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham.  She creates interwoven images bonded onto plywood (see figures 5, 6) and, I have discovered, via an email conversation with her, this week, that she coats them with acrylic varnish.  Her work is appropriate to my experimentation as she bonds (in her case) to a substrate (thus bears some similarity to my work) and most importantly protects the vulnerability of unique woven prints from damage and UV light by the use of this varnish.  My initial experimentation with concrete has led to a severe washing out of the imagery which was printed only on thin, standard paper, but nevertheless has drawn out the need for a solution.

Michelle Henning

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figures 7, 8

Having written about Henning’s Tate presentation in my journal, I have been signposted to I have discovered that she has a width of skills in the image world.  Not only is she a long term collaborator with PJ Harvey (see figure 6 for an example of her art work), thus providing an other ‘photographer/wider artist’ example, but she has written a book being published in 2018 “Photography – the Unfettered Image” which argues that this mobility of the image was merely accelerated by digital media and telecommunications. Photographs, from the moment of their invention, set images loose by making them portable, reproducible, projectable, reduced in size and multiplied”. But also as a photographic image maker she has created these ‘through the glass’ images which my work has echoed.

figures 9, 10

And she has explored construction sites, figures 10, 11

figures 11, 12

So, for me, another one to watch.

 

References (all sites visited 10.12.2017)

Rebecca Fairley

All images from : https://www.textileartist.org/rebecca-fairley-oca-textiles-tutor/

https://www.textileartist.org/

Samin Ahmadzadeh

All images from : http://www.samin-ahmadzadeh.com/

Michelle Henning

All images from : http://www.michellehenning.co.uk/

Book: https://www.routledge.com/Photography-The-Unfettered-Image/Henning/p/book/9781138782556

figure 7 Birdshit, Bristol to London (2009)

figure 8 Dirty Sunset, Bristol (2012)

figure 9 Ealing Shop Window from The White Album

figure 10 Closed Shop, Weston-Super-Mare | from The White Album

figures 11, 12 “Construction Work is an ongoing project of photographs of half-completed or abandoned construction sites. It is based around an implied analogy between the work of artistic construction and of building. Appropriating aesthetic devices from late modernism it takes accidental arrangements and reinvents them as staged spaces for action”.

Henning and PJ Harvey work:

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/apr/24/pj-harvey-england-shake-interview

https://www.creativereview.co.uk/designing-pj-harveys-hope-six-demolition-project/?mm_5a2d4c7a955b6=5a2d4c7a9565d

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Melancholia and Image Therapy

MA in Photography, Falmouth University, Module 4, Sustainable Prospects.  Research.

Partaking in two symposia in close series has provided me with a moment of review of other artists’ work, all of which held my a theme which I call “Melancholia and Image Therapy”.

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figure 1

During the Tate Cartographies session in 2017, Susan Philipsz extolled her sound art projects. In these, audio, with meaning locked into the locale, is set across landscapes at a city level (Edinburgh) but then across huge tracts of land in Scandinavia.  Perhaps her work at the Kassel Hauptbahnhof, Study for Strings for Documenta 13, in 2012 was the most steeped in a dreadful history.  The contemporary reworking of a piece composed in the Theresienstadt concentration camp which was performed by detainees who were then all killed by the Nazis, with the exception of the conductor.  The reworking, with silences and reduced score, to emulate the death of the participants, was played across the station platforms in 2012 via the PA system, figure 1.  Philipsz visually records all her work via still and moving image which provides a remnant of the perforative work for review but also captures the people witnessing the sounds and their responses.  Philipsz naturally responds to place and its history with her work with deeply researched feel for human history.

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figure 2

A few weeks later at the Grain ‘Responding to Landscape’ symposium in Birmingham, two presentations echoed the human tribulation and the response of making images as a way of dealing with family illness and death.  Matthew Murray has made a series of work on Saddleworth Moor, a place with an etched meaning for anyone in the UK with a sense of twentieth century history.  Murray spent days and nights with his assistant walking up, over, down and around the moors, image making, whilst a member of his family was dealing with tragic illnesses, perhaps as a counterpoint and empathy to that heaviness and sadness.  See one example of his work in figure 2.

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figure 3, 4

Murray was followed by Jem Southam who eloquently expressed his response to a bereavement by walking along rivers and by ponds with his camera and making work about place over and over again, figures 3, 4.  Walking and walking was expressed in his imagery.  His voice cracked as he retold his method as he gently rolled through a series of images.  One could not help but feel the sadness but also the beauty and infused pathos in the making and walking.

It was perhaps not necessary for me to look for wider affirmation that walking and looking through the lens to deal with life’s tough stuff is manifest; these visually powerful examples offer evidence alone and I add to that my own history; yet this piece my Bryce Evans in PsychCentral, about the saving nature of camera-work cites these outcomes “motivation to get outside and connect with nature, provides a shift in perspective (you’re literally looking through a new/different lens, often seeing the world differently), you begin searching for and finding beauty in the world”.

One concludes, making images is a therapeutic activity.

 

References (all accessed 10. 12. 2017)

Tate Symposium http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/conference/urban-encounters-2017-cartographies

Grain Symposium http://grainphotographyhub.co.uk/portfolio-type/responding-to-a-landscape-2/

Evans https://blogs.psychcentral.com/photography/2016/07/the-therapeutic-benefits-of-photography/

 

Image Sources:

Philipsz

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/susan-philipsz-war-damaged-musical-instruments/philipsz-introduction

introductionhttps://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2013/soundings/artists/11/works/

Murray

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=matthew+murray+landscape&rlz=1C5CHFA_enIT709GB710&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjBktjUrv_XAhXDKcAKHSDPDqcQ_AUICigB&biw=1242&bih=620#imgrc=BmEVrLzXUhv8AM:

Southam

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=jem+southam+landscape&rlz=1C5CHFA_enIT709GB710&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjGmpjjrv_XAhVpI8AKHbDZBTAQ_AUICigB&biw=1242&bih=620#imgrc=ZbEcpe6KppEwDM:

 

Work in Progress Portfolio

MA in Photography, Falmouth University, Module 4, Sustainable Prospects.  Submission.

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From six shoots undertaken during the sustainable prospects module I have selected 18 images to submit as my work in progress portfolio.

The Pause Project is in full flow, currently in Birmingham; five new buildings in the pause state have been accessed, along with the underbelly of M6 junction 6, that is Spaghetti Junction and the gallery in Walsall.

 

Images 1 – 7

Reviewing this group, these collectively reflect not only a maturing of a consistent ‘visual language’ but also the period which most were created, as Autumn approached and, in the case of The Roundhouse, captured in the melancholic state and deep light from the sun onto and into spaces.

As is consistent with the Pause Project to date, the spaces were vacant, life was absent but the humanity was demonstrable in the perambulations, ruthlessly so within image 4 where only the trace of a multi-level stair case and landings remained as they had been removed, leaving the visible marks on the walls in what is a disconcerting view.  Abandoned chairs feature in image 1 and 17, perhaps not seen as precious and thus abandoned, they serve to provide scale to those two spaces.

 

Images 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 17, 18

Of the many quotes on light in photography “Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography” attributed to George Eastman, was on my mind in these shoots. The first seven images, in diverse ways, visually identify the source of light into the spaces and through the translucent panels, the latter group reflect light. All the images reveal the use of ‘found’ light, there is no supplementary lighting.  The image that has drawn more time from me is image 2, the Roundhouse window; this is the most ‘painterly’ in the group; I use this term as I believe this is the nearest image I have made to date that dwells on the cusp of the immediate ‘surface’ manifesting the image as if looking ‘at’ a painted asset.  It is its apparent translucency that reveals an actual or implied depth, seeing ‘though’ to a faint but bright, almost spectral form, or series of shapes.  It is this translucency that one adopts in viewing that evokes the nature of a photograph.

 

Images   11, 14, 15, 16

My amplified interest in concrete as a medium to form space but also as a method of fused image making is contemplated in this portfolio by the intimate quality of the surface, countered by the enormity of structure in images 11, 14, 15 and 16.

It is the surprising, the unpredictability of visual stimulus and the emotive response one holds when visiting much planned and anticipated shoots.  There has been a sharp variability in this autumn’s shoots, with the Roundhouse laying before me a plethora of textures, detritus, views and depth whereas the negotiated access to John Madin’s own office and studio, 123 Hagley Road, was little more than vacuous with a simplicity of, well almost everything, even uncovering a vacated radio station studio did not create the richness in practice that one may anticipate.  This in part explains that the Roundhouse holds the majority of this portfolio than other shoots.

The submitted package includes the index slide, thus;

Image Titles – shoots August to November 2017

Intro slide 1

Intro slide 2

1 Roundhouse – chair

2 Roundhouse – window

3 Herbert House – main space

4 Herbert House – stair trace

5 Roundhouse – mirror

6 Herbert House – window

7 Herbert House – roof light

8 Herbert House – basement

9 Roundhouse – carpet

10 Roundhouse – socket

11 M6 Junction 6 – concrete surface

12 Roundhouse – ember

13 Gilders Yard – sink

14 New Art Gallery Walsall – stair

15 M6 Junction 6 – soffit

16 M6 Junction 6 – pipe

17 123 Hagley Road – chair

18 Gilders Yard – 3 spaces

Concluding slide

An Impromptu Shoot

MA in Photography, Falmouth University, Module 4, Sustainable Prospects. 

IMG_0506

I was able to access the vacated Coventry Evening Telegraph building days before the city was celebrating its new status as City of Culture 2021.  I was armed only with my iPhone as I was in the city for my portfolio reviews

The building was both cavernous and intimate and the perfect candidate for a more serious and planned Pause Project shoot, but the quality of the iPhone justifies the entry of these images here; it forms a recce for a future idea. No flash lighting was used, all light was ‘found’ as is my normal mode.

All images are mine.

Portfolio Review : Practice Development

MA in Photography, Falmouth University, Module 4, Sustainable Prospects.  Week 11.  

IMG_0540

figure 1

It was with eager anticipation that I attended the Grain Portfolio Development day at Herbert Art Gallery in Coventry on 2nd December 2017, facilitated by Grain Photo Hub.

This was to be my third portfolio review session (beyond my university critiques); this time around I was more prepared and anticipated it, with a good presentation and attentive ears.

The day was launched with talks from all four of the portfolio reviewers; Camilla Brown, curator, writer and lecturer on contemporary art and previously curator at The Photographers’ Gallery, London, Anthony Luvera, artist, photographer, writer and educator, Craig Ashley, Curator and Director of New Art West Midlands and Liz Hingley, photographer and anthropologist.

In summary, we were advised to prepare well, show up to 20 images and up to three projects/bodies of work.  It is a time limited session and is a negotiated transaction; expect to be concise but clear about the premise for one’s work and then allow time and space for the reviewed to pick up the work, shuffle it round and corral a response.  We should regard our portfolios as fluid objects that reflect our artistic voice that will develop and evolve with time and after reflection.  To connect with reviewers we were advised to research your reviewers and make a choice about who you see were there are options in order to extract as much useful critique as possible.  Inevitably exposure requires composure and when the work is strong and compelling it may, after time, be networked into other realms of the photography world via the reviewers. 

As I have found before, preparation for conflicting, curious, incisive, searching and sometimes upsetting advice; this isn’t an ego smoothing exercise, it is meant to cajole, provoke and make one fervent for betterment.

Every speaker advised that we should leave a post card or a sheet to be taken away, to linger with the reviewers; proving the point, Luvera left as all with copies of his community art work newspaper, ‘Not Going Shopping’.

Brown posited reviews will increasingly be on-line in the future; somewhat appropriate when the Flexible MA at Falmouth University is considered and its working methods.  Both Luvera and Hingley found that their practice took notable leaps forward after portfolio reviews by people who were either directly influential or were connected with people who were looking to commission, hang or publish work.  Source Magazine was mentioned numerous times in this context.

Curators were referenced on three occasions and Luvera noted that they can help connect with the artist but also provide a new editing eye that may link with a new narration of one’s work.  He also stated that the audience for your work should be borne in mind when presenting, i.e. the anticipated viewers and the context.

Craig Ashley, as a curator, facilitator and writer is an experienced witness of audiences across the UK Midlands has interfaced with many artists including photographic artists over many years, including the Peter Kennard exhibition at MAC Birmingham in 2016 which I had especially admired for its layering of imagery and its powerful messaging.  He quoted Maria Balshaw (whom I was fortunate to briefly worked with in Birmingham)  made succinct points about curating see figure 2.

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figure 2

Ashley cited Jon Tonks book Empire that sat alongside a body of visual work and maps and, with Ashley, an holistic show was created from this breadth of collateral. 

Hingley spoke about her body of work, Under Gods, 2007-09 (also a published photobook) and the influences of Martin Parr and asking Richard Billingham to review here work. She reminded us to maintain momentum around applying for awards and completions to keep up the chances of being seen and awarded.  As a result of this she was asked to create the Shanghai version of the ‘Portraits de Villes’.

The Reviews

I was rather pleased that, whilst one could choose two of the four available reviewers, I was offered an additional slot with a third.  In summary all three were distinct and highly useful for my moment of evolution with my work.

Craig Ashley

Following an introduction to the premise for the Pause Project and the selected 10 images in my portfolio box we spoke about;

Referencing James Webb at Coventry Cathedral who is using audio from the Dean’s broadcast when the cathedral was bombed in 1940 as a memoriam related to my anticipated multi media final MA show.

On discussing the venue for my final show Ashley cited Jan Svoboda (1934-1990) who, upon subsequent research (see footnote below),  I note created unique pieces, in response to my thinking about unique, concrete based imagery.

We discussed materiality, texture, environment, scale, light and print finish that would help inform the characteristics of my final installation.

Footnotes on Jan Svoboda:

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figure 3

Jan Svoboda was interviewed with Liba Taylor for British Journal of Photography 1982 – an archive I will endeavour to uncover.

From these links I note Svoboda was constantly endeavouring to create unique images using substrates; my concrete work has the same objective.

http://phototoolbox.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/photographer-jan-svoboda.html

http://www.atelierjosefasudka.cz/en/archive/comparison-ii.html

From https://www.photoeditionberlin.com/programm/czech-fundamental/jan-svoboda/  accessed 3.12.2017, I embolden the pertinent points here;

“In an effort to achieve maximum degree of autonomy of the photographic image, Svoboda, thanks to fundamental and original formal innovation, reached the very limits of the possible. Due to their sophisticated techniques, his works entirely shook off the principle of being reproduceable and thus became (paradoxically for photography) unique works of art. Their solitary nature was emphasised, Svoboda being unaccustomed in those days to large formats, by a total absence of framing, the use of a solid foundation with a supporting framework, of detaching the works from the surface of the wall. Photographs are thus elevated to the rank of objects that communicate independently with both the exibition space and the atmosphere of the lighting”.

From www.artmap.cz/jan-svoboda-1934-1990 accessed 3.12.2017 – here he notably exhibited with a sculptor and an artist – demonstrating his mix of company; “Jan Svoboda was more inclined to the company of artists, as it was called his time, than photographers. Although the marginal, yet distinctive detail remains that he likes to sign directly into the picture. However, Jaromír Zemina provided the exhibition with the May group (1964) when he introduced his works together with the statues of Jiří Seifert and the drawings of Václav Boštík in the exhibition O světlu (1994)”.

Liz Hingley

After viewing the images and talking about the body of work and its direction towards an installation and potentially a photobook,  Liz spoke about links to people in Birmingham that she is presently working with (for example Claire Mullett – https://culturalintermediation.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/arts-science-festival-1960s-art-architecture-tour/ accessed 3.12.2017)  and talked about scanning items that I have quietly liberated from some of my shoots and also the possibility of creating wallpaper from my images.

We talked about ‘feeling the atmosphere’ in the space where my final show would be hosted – to emulate the conveyance in my prints and images.  This echoed the discussion with Ashley.

Camilla Brown

Camilla Brown appeared enthralled by one image in particular and this delighted me because I too had highlighted it as the key piece in my work in progress portfolio, a painterly piece from the Round House and its window. 

I used the word ‘documenting’ as one descriptor for my work  but Brown queried this and felt that the work was more “evoking curiosity” and takes you to a “different place” than perhaps a pure catalogued documenting process may lead to.  We discussed Edgar Martins and his ‘Soliloquies on Death, Life and Other Interludes’ and the degree of translation and selection that even then demurred from the original order of the source, thus not wholly documented and indeed manipulated digitally.  My response was to say I was perhaps then a “visually led art image maker” – though I think this still requires distillation.

Brown directed me to John Divola and Lucio Fontana.  See figure 4 for Divola’s work in abandoned spaces.

Screen Shot 2017-12-03 at 17.59.33

figure 4

Brown predicted that my Pause Project would develop sub-series and new threads as it moved forward.

I mentioned that I had planned to create a zine for distribution to developers and landowners to gather more shooting opportunities in the New Year – she extremely usefully suggested that I sought out cities that would be hosting future photographic festivals such as Brighton, Liverpool and Derby for the strategic exhibiting approach this may provide.

Finally Brown suggested a textual response to my work that is “fluid and creative” – I explained that I enjoyed writing about photography.  Haiku was mentioned as a potential pattern as was Rinko Kawauchi for her work.

http://www.rinkokawauchi.com/main/rinkokawauchi_eg.html

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/lucio-fontana-1102

http://www.divola.com

References

Camilla Brown www.camillaebrown.co.uk

Anthony Luvera http://www.luvera.com/

Liz Hingley http://lizhingley.com/

Craig Ashley http://newartwestmidlands.co.uk/who-we-are/

 

Cited by Craig Ashley

Jon Tonks, https://www.jontonks.com/books/

 

Cited by Liz Hingley

Portraits de Ville,  http://www.portraitsdevilles.fr/en/vues-choisies-/70-shanghai-liz-hingley.html

 

Cited by Camilla Brown

http://www.rinkokawauchi.com/main/rinkokawauchi_eg.html

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/lucio-fontana-1102

http://www.divola.com

https://www.photoeditionberlin.com/programm/czech-fundamental/jan-svoboda/

https://www.photoeditionberlin.com/programm/czech-fundamental/jan-svoboda/